60 Results
Literary Form
60 Results
Did you mean? Amos Canine Amos Junin
Don't do that! —Amos, Janine.

Two brief stories demonstrate the importance of telling someone to quit when you do not like what they are doing, as well as telling them what you would like for them to do instead.

It's mine! —Amos, Janine.

Two brief stories demonstrate the importance of sharing, being careful with the property of others, and taking turns.

Move over! —Amos, Janine.

Two brief stories demonstrate that people can feel cramped and angry when they do not have enough space, and the importance of looking for more space when it is needed.

It won't work! —Amos, Janine.

Two brief stories demonstrate the importance of staying calm and thinking about how to solve the problem when things do not work on the first try.

Words are not for hurting —Verdick, Elizabeth.

Encourages toddlers and preschoolers to express themselves using helpful, not hurtful, words. Includes a note for parents and caregivers on language development.

Taking turns —Amos, Janine.

Provides examples and tips for working things out when two people want the same thing.

Being helpful —Amos, Janine.

Provides examples and tips for being helpful when one is with others.

Admitting mistakes —Amos, Janine.

Provides examples and tips for making things better when one has made a mistake that upsets someone else.

Hello —Amos, Janine.

We say "hello" to people we know to make them feel welcome or to give them a greeting in return.

No, thank you —Amos, Janine.

To let others know in a kind way that we don't want something, people say "No, thank you" and smile.

Thank you —Amos, Janine.

When others give us help, time, or presents, people say "thank you" to show that they value these gifts.

Don't say that! —Amos, Janine.

Two brief stories demonstrate the importance of avoiding mocking and careless speech when we speak to one another.

Sharing —Amos, Janine.

Provides examples and tips for working things out fairly when two people want the same thing.

Please —Amos, Janine.

To show others we care about their feelings, people say "please" when they would like something or when they need help.

Go away! —Amos, Janine.

Two brief stories demonstrate the importance of looking at a situation from another person's point of view when both of you want the same thing.

Making friends —Amos, Janine.

Provides examples and tips for making friends, which is sometimes easy and sometimes hard.

After you —Amos, Janine.

When we let someone else go ahead of us or when we courteously wait for our turn, we say "After you" to show that we respect others.

Let's make friends —Amos, Janine, author.

Two brief stories demonstrate how to make new friends at the park and during indoor activities.

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