Book jacket
Brown girl dreaming

Book

2014
"Jacqueline Woodson, one of today's finest writers, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verse. Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child's soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson's eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become. Praise for Jacqueline Woodson: Ms. Woodson writes with a sure understanding of the thoughts of young people, offering a poetic, eloquent narrative that is not simply a story. but a mature exploration of grown-up issues and self-discovery."-The New York Times Book Review"--Provided by publisher.

Item Details

Williams-Garcia, Rita — Rita Williams-Garcia and Jacqueline Woodson both write compelling, issue-oriented novels about teens of color. Both authors address issues of class and race, while also emphasizing the importance of friendships and family in helping their strong protagonists surmount the obstacles they face. -- Kelly White
Booth, Coe — Both Coe Booth and Jacqueline Woodson present compelling stories with African American characters, who deal with the challenges that life throws at them in a matter-of-fact way. Frequently set in the city, their emotionally-intense stories are filled with authentic characters. Woodson's writing style is more spare and at times lyrical. -- Beth Gerall
Johnson, Angela, 1961- — Angela Johnson and Jacqueline Woodson write emotionally intense, lyrical African-American teen fiction,though Woodson's work tends to be grittier and more dialect-rich than Johnson's books, which address the same serious issues in a milder, more hopeful tone. Both authors also write picture books for younger kids. -- Kelly White
Chabon, Michael; Trigiani, Adriana — These authors' works are Moving and Character-driven, and they share: the subject 'New York City'.
Zindel, Paul — These authors' works are Angst-filled, Compelling, and Issue-oriented, and they share: the subjects 'New York City' and 'Brothers and sisters'.
Coben, Harlan, 1962-; De la Cruz, Melissa, 1971- — These authors' works are Compelling and Fast-paced, and they share: the subjects 'New York City' and 'Secrets'.
Myers, Walter Dean, 1937-2014 — These authors' works are Moving, Conversational, and Compelling, and they share: the subjects 'New York City' and 'Friendship'.
Cabot, Meg — These authors' works are Angst-filled, Conversational, and Character-driven, and they share: the subjects 'New York City' and 'Friendship'.
Taylor, Theodore, 1921-2006 — These authors' works are Moving, Emotionally intense, and Compelling, and they share: the subjects 'Interracial friendship' and 'Friendship'.
McDonell, Nick — These authors' works are Angst-filled and Fast-paced, and they share: the subject 'New York City'.

Reader Reviews

Approval Rating: 12.5% (1/8)
Average Rating: 3.69

☆☆☆☆☆

By blue_dog_1998 on Tue, 25 Jul 2017 22:31:15

From the summer reading book list, I decided to read the book titled, " Brown Girl Dreaming" by Jaqueline Woodson. This book was a bout Jaqueline Woodson's life and all the challenges she overcame. One of the main reasons I chose to read this book was because during the school year my library teacher took us to the central library near prospect park to meet the author of this book, Jacqueline Woodson. Ms. Woodson explained how the book, and many of her other books, was structured and what they were about. She also explained what inspired her to write specific sections of this book. While reading this book I witnessed many of the things which Jaqueline had talked about in her speech. One thing that caught my attention in her speech and the book was the structure of the book. This book was made up of many short stories and poem, put together as 'chapters', to show a specific memory in her life. My library teacher explained to us that Jaqueline Woodson said that she created her book in this format because it shows that you don't remember every detail about your past. You can only remember certain moments that stood out. Hearing this reminded me of how much work goes into writing a book. Final thoughts? Well I really liked the different techniques Ms. Woodson use, such as foreshadowing. one example of this is that she had said her grandfather was constantly coughing and out of breath, foreshadowing that he was sick and would soon die. the book was so well written that I felt as sad as Jaqueline did when her grandfather passed away.

★★★★☆

By Betsy Simmons on Thu, 13 Apr 2017 11:38:28

★★★★☆ Great!

By Reader's Choice on Mon, 20 Jul 2015 18:08:36

Great

☆☆☆☆☆

By Patron80549 on Sat, 29 Nov 2014 18:11:42

In her memoir, Woodson shares what it was like to grow up black in the 1960s and 1970s, during the Civil Rights movement, in both the North and the South, always supported by deep family love. Told in verse, the book also describes her joy at finding her voice through writing.

☆☆☆☆☆

By Patron80549 on Sat, 29 Nov 2014 18:12:14

In her memoir, Woodson shares what it was like to grow up black in the 1960s and 1970s, during the Civil Rights movement, in both the North and the South, always supported by deep family love. Told in verse, the book also describes her joy at finding her voice through writing.

☆☆☆☆☆

By Patron80549 on Sat, 29 Nov 2014 18:12:34

In her memoir, Woodson shares what it was like to grow up black in the 1960s and 1970s, during the Civil Rights movement, in both the North and the South, always supported by deep family love. Told in verse, the book also describes her joy at finding her voice through writing.

☆☆☆☆☆

By Patron80549 on Sat, 29 Nov 2014 18:12:52

In her memoir, Woodson shares what it was like to grow up black in the 1960s and 1970s, during the Civil Rights movement, in both the North and the South, always supported by deep family love. Told in verse, the book also describes her joy at finding her voice through writing.

☆☆☆☆☆

By Patron80549 on Sat, 29 Nov 2014 18:13:10

In her memoir, Woodson shares what it was like to grow up black in the 1960s and 1970s, during the Civil Rights movement, in both the North and the South, always supported by deep family love. Told in verse, the book also describes her joy at finding her voice through writing.

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